Aimee Chabot

Society for Judgment and Decision Making Annual Meeting

Long Beach, CA

Friday, November 21 - Monday, November 24

Abstract: Title: Distracted by donuts? The cognitive strain of calorie counting may undermine focus and work performance Providing food in the workplace is an increasingly popular practice. But, work on the psychology of scarcity suggests that restrained eaters, when reminded of tempting food, may experience cognitive strain from the demands of managing a calorie budget. Participants prescreened for restricted eating completed cognitive tasks in the presence of either an empty donut box, half-full donut box, or jug of water. Calorie counters performed worse in the presence of an empty donut box, suggesting that simple reminders of food are enough to impose consequential cognitive demands on calorie counters, which may unfairly affect their performance in the workplace.

Award: $300

Ananda Suresh

Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS)

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Monday, December 8 - Saturday, December 13

Abstract: Statistical and machine-learning algorithms are frequently applied to high-dimensional data. In many of these applications data is scarce, and often much more costly than computation time. We provide the first sample-efficient polynomial-time estimator for high-dimensional spherical Gaussian mixtures. For mixtures of any number k of d-dimensional spherical Gaussians, we derive an intuitive spectral-estimator that approximates the distribution to within L_1 distance \epsilon using O(dk^9 log^2d /epsilon^4) samples and runs in time O(d^3 log^5 d). We also show that Omega(dk / epsilon^2) samples are needed for any algorithm. Hence the sample complexity is near-optimal in dimension. In addition, we derive a simple estimator for one-dimensional mixtures that uses O(k/ epsilon^2 log k/epsilon) samples and runs in time O((k/epsilon)^(3k+1)), and construct a faster algorithm for choosing from a set of distributions, the one that minimizes the L_1 distance to an unknown underlying distribution.

Award: $500

Angel Ruacho

American Gep[hysical Union Fall Meeting

San Francisco

Monday, December 15 - Friday, December 19

Abstract: Dissolved organic copper-binding ligands were examined on the U.S. GEOTRACES zonal transect in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific from Peru to Tahiti. All samples were measured using competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV), and a subset were analyzed using multiple competition strengths of the added ligand salicylaldoxime (1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 µM). Titration data was processed using newly available multiple analytical window data processing techniques, which unify the multiple window dataset as a whole. Multiple competition strengths of the added ligand enabled the detection of an additional weaker class of copper-binding ligand, compared to the two stronger ligand classes which have been measured previously in the open ocean. The strongest ligand class (L1) ranged in concentration from 1-10 nmol/L and had a conditional stability constant (logK) ranging from approximately 15.0-16.0. The weaker ligand classes (L2, and L3) were present in much higher concentrations even in surface waters, with concentrations ranging from 5-50 nmol/L and conditional stability constants ranging from 8.6-12.5. The elevated ligand concentrations, both in surface and deep waters, lead to extremely low concentrations of Cu2+ throughout the transect, possibly influencing important biogeochemical processes such as inducible iron acquisition by diatoms, and ammonium oxidation in the oxygen minimum zone.

Award: $300

Anne Therese Frederiksen

Conceptual Structure, Discourse and Language 2014

Santa Barbara

Tuesday, November 4 - Thursday, November 6

Abstract: In referring to given entities, spoken language L2 learners are known to be overly specific in their use of reference forms (Hendriks 2003). We tested whether the over-specification patterns of reference - mostly overuse of nouns and pronouns for given referents - also occur for hearing L2 learners of ASL, despite modality differences. We elicited short ASL narratives by Deaf native and beginning L2 signers. We identified person and object references and determined their type (nominal/pronoun/zero anaphor/classifier) and discourse status. Our analyses revealed that native and L2 signers referred to given entities differently, and that this was driven by greater reliance on classifiers in the native signer narratives. Unexpectedly, no other difference between the groups was significant. These results suggest that creating coherence in sign poses unique challenges for L2 learners because this process relies on linguistic forms outside the broad noun/pronoun/zero distinctions generally employed within studies of spoken reference.

Award: $300

Arman Rezaee

Northeastern Universities Development Consortium Conference (NEUDC)

Boston, MA

Saturday, November 1 - Sunday, November 2

Abstract: Living in Ungoverned Space: Pakistan's Frontier Crimes Regulation Why do substantial swathes of territory remain ungoverned for long periods of time? We explore this question using a unique set of legal institutions in Pakistan that clearly demarcate spaces that are to be left ungoverned. During colonial rule, the British divided Pakistan into two distinct regions. The first was the Raj, where the British built modern political and bureaucratic institutions. In the second region, the British put a small number of political agents in charge of tribal areas and codified pre-colonial institutions in the Frontier Crimes Regulation (FCR). Legal decisions were left to customary law carried out by local tribal councils, or jirgas. Though the area under FCR has steadily decreased, FCR is still in place in the tribal areas of Pakistan today. This makes Pakistan a prime case study in the choice by both colonial and modern governments to leave territory ungoverned in an environment of broadly weak institutions. We use primary legal documents to create a dataset of when and where FCR applied in Pakistan between 1901 and 2012 at the sub-district level. We then exploit the differential impact of the Green Revolution on potential land revenue at the sub-district level empirically model this choice to leave territory ungoverned. We find that sub-districts that we predict would see a disproportionate increase in potential land revenue as a result of the Green Revolution are disproportionately more likely to have FCR removed following the advent of the Green Revolution, relative to before.

Award: $500

Benjamin Kellman

iGEM

Boston, MA

Saturday, November 1 - Monday, November 3

Abstract: Synthetic genetic circuits created by synthetic biologists have yielded exciting applications such as biofuels production and cancer killing bacteria. These circuits are often difficult to engineer, requiring months to design, build, and test each individual genetic device involved in the circuit. Although there are many genetic devices that have been built, re-using these devices often requires a time-consuming review of the literature. The UCSD Software iGEM team addressed this challenge by creating a web-tool that leverages existing genetic devices to create complex genetic circuits. We accomplished this by building a comprehensive database that captures the behavior, composition, and interactions of existing genetic devices in the literature. We visualized and are making publicly accessible this database of interacting synthetic genetic circuits. To facilitate accession we devised algorithms to search this network for sets of genetic devices that can be used to construct a complex genetic circuit. In the coming weeks we will launch our application, SBiDer, and share our integrated genetic circuitry database and querying software with the public.

Award: $500

Bridget Druken

World Association of Lesson Studies

Bandung, Indonesia

Tuesday, November 25 - Friday, November 28

Abstract: Purpose: While lesson study has become increasingly popular in the US since the mid 1990s (Stigler and Hiebert, 1999), relatively little research exists surrounding issues sustaining teachers’ lesson study experiences. This study investigates supportive and constraining factors in 80 US mathematics teachers of grades 3 through Algebra 1 (students 8–14 years old) with some district support continuing lesson study after their relationship with university faculty ended. Methodology: Teaching is embedded within institutional settings: classrooms, school sites and districts (Cobb, McClain, Lamberg & Dean, 2003), with teachers members of communities formally arranged by the school or district, and informally arranged by themselves (Kramer, 2003). This works aims to understand supports that sustain teachers’ professional learning communities focused on lesson study as situated within institutional settings. For this study, data corpus includes survey results from 80 teachers of mathematics asking about lesson study intentions and support for intentions, and clinical interview data from 30 teacher and district participants. Data was collected 6-12 months after the conclusion of former grant. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods (Corbin & Strauss, 1990) and informed by Woolcock’s (1998) conditions of sustainability: integration, linkage, organizational integrity and synergy. Results: I first characterize which aspects of lesson study have continued as reported by participants. I then report on factors that appear to support continuing to engage in lesson study. Implications: Practically, we consider how to better support teachers in professional development in engaging in lesson study after grants ends to address issues of sustainability. Theoretically, we consider the need to reconceptualize sustainability for lesson study. Originality/Value: This research examines practices and communities that get reorganized when relationships among teachers shift. Theoretically, this study encourages thinking about how to define sustainability with lesson study productively and whether sustainability a la Woolcock’s (1998) sustainability model is appropriate. References Cobb, P., McClain, K., Lamberg, T. de S., & Dean, C. (2003). Situating Teachers’ Instructional Practices in the Institutional Setting of the School and District. Educational Researcher, 32(6), 13–24. Corbin, J. M., & Strauss, A. (1990). Grounded theory research: Procedures, canons, and evaluative criteria. Qualitative Sociology, 13(1), 3–21. Stigler, J., & Hiebert. (1999). The Teaching Gap: Best Ideas from the World’s Teachers for Improving Education in the Classroom. New York, NY: The Free Press. Woolcock, M. (1998). Social capital and economic development: Toward a theoretical synthesis and policy framework. Theory and Society, 27(2), 151–208.

Award: $500

Cailey Bromer

Society for Neuroscience

Washington, D.C.

Saturday, November 15 - Wednesday, November 19

Abstract: AUTHOR BLOCK: *C. BROMER1,2,3, T. M. BARTOL1, J. KINNEY2, K. HARRIS3, T. SEJNOWSKI1; 1CNL, Salk Inst. For Biol. Studies, San Diego, CA; 2Synthetic Neurobio. Group: MIT Ctr. for Neurobiological Engin., MIT, Boston, MA; 3Section of Neurobiology; Ctr. for Learning and Memory; Inst. for Neurosci., The Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Abstract: Changes in the strengths of synapses drive changes in neuronal computation. The size of a dendritic spine head is highly correlated with the size of the presynaptic axon active zone and both are directly related to the strength of the synapse. In an electron microscopic reconstruction of the hippocampal neuropil, we analyzed the dimensions of the spine heads, the areas of postsynaptic densities, and the availability of presynaptic vesicles of neurotransmitter at synapses on CA1 apical dendrites and found that pairs of dendritic spines on the same dendritic branch receiving input from a single presynaptic axon are nearly identical in size (CV = 0.083). Despite a small sample size, the relationship is highly significant over a factor of 60 in spine head sizes, which implies 6 bits of accuracy. This does not occur for dendritic spines located on different dendrites but synapsing with the same presynaptic axon. Although there are numerous sources of variability in the responses of synapses, including low neurotransmitter release probabilities, the precision indicated here suggests that the biochemical pathways inside excitatory hippocampal synapses is tightly controlled and in particular must be able to average the impact of input spike trains over many minutes. If similar precision is found at excitatory synapses on pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex then the capacity of the brain to store information may be much higher than previously thought.

Award: $500

Catherine Czacki

Sculpture Center In Practice

New York City

Tuesday, January 20 - Monday, January 26

Abstract: For the In Practice exhibition at Sculpture Center, I will create an arrangement of various sculptures that question the division between the found and the made, the raw and the manufactured. Once an object is stripped of context, how does it read as a form? Does some trace of its prior material life show through? The objects I propose to display wear the ‘marks’ of their culture, bear traces, and change meaning in recombined form. Some objects are rescued from trash heaps, some are sentimental gifts from friends, and yet others are mysterious in origin. The palm sheds its frond in the way that the human sheds its objects. Chairs suggest the affordances of the culture we come from, where the human subject sits hierarchically over the world of matter. Chairs hide in the rooms where people work, but always retain their relationship to the body, even when empty. All of the objects in this proposed arrangement have currency with bodies, they are components that become uncanny body substitutes when broken apart and recombined, displayed in return upon chairs and tables. Sports implements and tools for the disabled or emotional body, components to personal technological devices – are all resistant in their analog state. Filled with paper pulp – the cell phone case is incapable of communicating. These are objects that have an uneasy relationship with subjects – dialectical extremes of able and disabled bodies. Subtractions and additions, burns and hollowed parts.The readymade and the found object have not died as impulses – their ghosts haunt. The things keep coming back, those that we discard or hide in basements and back rooms. These are the many hauntings of modernism – the non-western, the domestic, the broken technologies and consumer waste. How does a material practice that is seldom considered a technology – in this case, Papier-mâché – lend to a serious discussion of the object? Paired with things abandoned, misused, relegated to the basement – biomorphic forms attach themselves to the objects uneasily. They don't speak to our psyche in the Surrealist flea market manner of André Breton, rather they speak to their own materiality and ours. What breaks and no longer works, what keeps persisting as an object though we no longer want it in sight. They are un-assuming objects of ‘low-plane’ reality (Norman Bryson), which become poetic and grotesque, sad and sentimental when framed as art. Like us humans, they are dialectical machines containing positives and negatives. The system is mean, bodies break down and objects become nullified in the exchange system. Value is a monster that can’t take it slow. Though the aging object and human admit defeat, they might also provide a methodology for stealing time from the dominant order of production and consumption. They are intimate objects, abandoned objects, non-specific yet highly referential objects, unambitious sculptures and arrangements that negotiate the status of human animals producing culture. This work will be additionally framed by a piece of writing – circling around themes both historical and current – primarily to do with the readymade object as it is deployed by artists both past and present.

Award: $500

Cheng-i Wang

IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia

Taichung, Taiwan

Wednesday, December 10 - Friday, December 12

Abstract: In this paper a new method, Variable Markov Oracle, for clustering time series data points is proposed. Variable Markov Oracle is based on previous results of Audio Oracle, a method of fast indexing repeating sub-clips in an audio stream. The proposed method is capable of discovering natural clusters with temporal relations without specifying the number of clusters. The discovery of inherent clusters in time series data points allows the devising of an efficient algorithm for time series query-matching. The ability of discovering clusters is demonstrated with a synthetic audio example, and an application of querying 3D skeletal gesture using the query-matching algorithm based on the proposed method is experimented with comparable result to state of the art.

Award: $500

Christopher Pierse

Single Molecule Biophysics Conference

Aspen, Colorado

Sunday, January 4 - Friday, January 9

Abstract: Title: The Distinct Observable Signatures of Multi-Pathway Conformational Transitions in Biomolecules Abstract: Complex biomolecules and biomolecular assemblies are typically characterized by equally complex conformational transitions. A prime example of this complexity is a transition that occurs via competing pathways, where the competition between pathways is often essential for biological function. However, how can one recognize the presence of competing pathways and distinguish it from other mechanisms, based on the data from single-molecule pulling experiments? Here, we identify a set of distinct signatures in the experimentally measurable force-dependent rates and distribution of transition forces that can be used as diagnostic tools to distinguish the multi-pathway mechanism among several candidate mechanisms. The developed theory enables one to identify the underlying multi-pathway kinetic scheme and results in analytical expressions that can be readily fit to experimental data to extract the barriers and rates that define each of the competing pathways.

Award: $500

Da Meng

Society for Neuroscience 44th Annual Meeting

Washington DC

Saturday, November 15 - Wednesday, November 19

Abstract: Neurotransmitter switching in single neurons in the adult rat brain. D. Meng1*, D. Dulcis1, S. Leutgeb1, K. Deisseroth2, and N.C. Spitzer1. 1 Neurobiology Section, Division of Biological Sciences, Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind, UCSD, La Jolla, CA 2 Department of Bioengineering, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA/Howard Hughes Medical Institute The nervous system responds to changes in endogenous activity and the external environment by modulating its function through various forms of neuroplasticity, many of which occur at synapses. However, it has been believed that neurotransmitters are fixed and invariant in the brain. Recent work has demonstrated activity-dependent transmitter respecification in neuronal populations both in the developing and adult nervous system. For example, the numbers of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and somatostatin (SST) neurons in the hypothalamus of the adult rat change in response to altered photoperiods. Long days (19hr:5hr L:D) decrease the number of DA neurons and increase the number of SST neurons by the same amount, which leads to depression-like behaviors. Short days (5L:19D) elicit the opposite effects. Can single neurons switch their transmitter? Despite evidence demonstrating transmitter switching in neuronal populations, it remains unclear whether this form of plasticity takes place by single neuron reprogramming in the adult brain. We have taken a genetic approach to permanently label DA neurons, by injecting the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (PaVN) of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)::Cre rats with a Cre-dependent AAV virus expressing EYFP. The originally inverted viral EYFP sequence is flipped in neurons expressing TH, and EYFP expression is driven by an internal promoter independent of Cre. Since EYFP expression persists during long-day exposure when PaVN DA neurons lose TH expression, formerly DA neurons can be identified. Following viral injection and long-day exposure, brains were stained for TH and SST and compared to controls (12L:12D). If transmitter switching takes place only within single neurons, the formerly DA neurons (EYFP+) will lose TH and express SST instead. In contrast, if transmitter switching occurs only at the population level, the formerly DA population and the newly acquired SST population will remain separate. Our results indicate that EYFP+SST+TH- neurons are present following 19L:5D exposure, indicating that these formerly DA neurons have acquired the SST phenotype. Additionally, EYFP+SST-TH- neurons and EYFP-SST+TH- neurons are also present, consistent with switching at the population level. We are quantifying these results with multichannel fluorescence stereology. These findings identify an unexpected flexibility of the hardwired connectome. Since transmitter respecification can involve a switch between excitatory and inhibitory transmitters that alters behavior, this activity-dependent plasticity may explain a variety of normal behaviors and neurological disorders. Supported by the UCSD/Salk biology graduate program to DM and the Ellison Medical Foundation and WM Keck Foundation to NCS and DD.

Award: $500

Dongjin Song

NIPS 2014 Workshop on Optimization for Machine Learning

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Friday, December 12 - Friday, December 12

Abstract: Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), which aims to approximate a data matrix with two nonnegative low rank matrices, is a popular dimensionality reduction and clustering technique. Due to the non-convex formulation and the nonnegativity constraints on the two low rank matrices (with rank r > 0), it is often difficult to solve NMF efficiently and accurately. Recently, the alternating direction method of multiplier (ADMM) was shown to be more accurate and efficient than traditional approaches such as the multiplicative update rule (MUR) or alternating least square (ALS). Nevertheless, the computation of ADMM is proportional to the cube of the rank of because of the underlying matrix inverse problem and thus may be inefficient when r is relatively large. In this paper, we propose a rank-one ADMM to address this problem. In each step, we search for a rank-one solution of NMF based upon ADMM and utilize greedy search to obtain the low rank matrices. In this way, rank-one ADMM avoids the matrix inverse problem and the computation is only linearly proportional to r. Thorough empirical studies demonstrate that rank-one ADMM is more efficient and accurate than baseline approaches.

Award: $500

Erica Fontana

American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting

Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, December 3 - Sunday, December 7

Abstract: The frequently critiqued, but still influential, paradigms of postsocialist and postcolonial studies under which much of the research by Westerners working in Central and Eastern Europe and Africa has often been de facto categorized have the potential to render other interpretations invisible. An asymmetrical relation of power is prevalent in many accounts, underlain by implicit beliefs in the superiority of “Western” theories and paradigms and – paradoxically, at the same time – in that of emic empirical accounts. This becomes apparent in the analysis of contemporary public representations of national history, such as museum exhibitions. Many of these representations, in contrast to the aforementioned paradigms, bracket certain periods of history, such as that of state socialism, as characterized by misinformation from which “true” histories must be recovered, emphasizing other paradigms and producing a continuous present-and-future-oriented past. Analogous processes are apparent in African postcolonial states. The task of interpreting the meaning(s), and future direction(s), of the current “memory boom,” as reflected in historical museums, can be approached from multiple perspectives, drawing not just on local empirical knowledge but also on locally developed theories and paradigms. As ethnographers, we must not only navigate multiple interpretations, but we must also ask how theories “travel” to inform the production of anthropology beyond their original contexts. Key Words: Poland, Africa, historical museums, history, theory, knowledge

Award: $500

Jiunda Lin

Southern Political Science Association Annual Conference

New Orleans

Thursday, January 15 - Saturday, January 17

Abstract: This paper tries to explain the change of national monetary policies choices in authoritarian regimes. It argues that the monetary policy outcomes in authoritarian regimes could be explained by the strategic interactions between political factions. Since exchange rate policy can generate a redistributional effect, the authoritarian leader has incentives to use the policy to fortify his faction and weaken his challengers’ economic coalition bases. The monetary policy outcomes will depend on the degree that the challengers can block the policy. This paper uses RMB appreciation during 2003 to 2010 as a case to illustrate the factional model. This paper will use Time Series Cross-Section analysis and game theory to analyze the factional data and economic data during 2003-2013. The results show that the economic redistribution effect of RMB appreciation would benefit the political leader’s faction and weaken his challenger’s faction in provinces, and the level of the RMB appreciation would depend on the factions’ strategic interactions in the central level.

Award: $500

James Daniels

71st Southeastern Archaeological Conference

Greenville, SC

Wednesday, November 12 - Saturday, November 15

Abstract: Using pXRF to Measure Chemical Variability of Potsherds from the Hickory Log Site (9CK9) in Cherokee County, Georgia Hickory Log (9CK9) is a multi-component prehistoric and early historic period Native American site on the north side of the Etowah River in Cherokee County, Georgia. A sample of the ceramic assemblage from 9CK9 was analyzed with a pXRF spectrometer in order to determine if the elemental composition of the potsherds covaries with either the stylistic attributes of the sherds or their presumed age based on typology. The results of the study indicate changes in paste recipes through time suggesting more sedentary lifeways. Paste recipes also differ in association with vessel form and surface treatment suggesting packaged manufacturing techniques.

Award: $500

Jason Pipkin

Society For Neuroscience

Washington D.C.

Saturday, November 15 - Wednesday, November 19

Abstract: The medicinal leech is a segmented annelid with 21 stereotyped midbody ganglia each responsible for sensing, communicating with the other ganglia, and producing behavior relevant to the segment it innervates. These ganglia all contain the same complement of approximately 400 neurons. Each neuron possesses a large cell body arranged on the exterior of the ganglion, and a central region of neuropil where the synaptic circuitry is established. To begin unraveling this circuitry, we are applying a connectomic approach relying on serial blockface electron microscopy (SBEM). Here we present data collected from an entire ganglion collected from a smaller but still behaviorally-mature juvenile leech. Within this volume of data, we have segmented several motor neurons and identified the connections between them. With this dataset, we show that we can identify known synapses (identified via previous experiments using intracellular electrophysiology) and that we can begin answering questions about the number and spatial distribution of these synapses in the neuropil.

Award: $500

Jeremy Egnatios

The Obesity Society

Boston, MA

Monday, November 3 - Wednesday, November 5

Abstract: Importance: Many companies provide targeted, direct-to-consumer genetic testing for obesity-related polymorphisms and make dietary recommendations in order to help weight loss. Objective: To evaluate whether nutrigenetic-guided, personalized dietary recommendations improve weight loss in an established weight management program. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a prospective, randomized controlled feasibility trial. Obese US veterans enrolled in the Veterans Administration San Diego Health System’s MOVE! program, which is an 8-week, evidence-based weight management program for overweight and obese veterans, between November 2012 and March 2014. Intervention: Participants were randomized either to a nutrigenetic-guided diet based on a direct-to-consumer commercial test (GT group) or to a balanced diet, standard therapy (ST group) in a non-stratified, two group feasibility trial design. To aid in simplicity and adherence, all diet plans incorporated prepared entrees at lunch and dinner for the first 8 weeks of the study. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s): The main and secondary objective was to determine whether more participants in the GT group lost ≥5% of their weight, compared to those in the ST group, after 8 weeks and 24 weeks, respectively. Results: Compared to the ST, the GT group had no significant difference in the percentage of participants who lost 5% of their weight at 8 weeks (26.9% ± 17.1 vs. 35.0% ± 20.9, p = 0.28 for GT and ST respectively; difference in proportion 8.1% with CI of -17.5% to 33.5%). No significant difference was found in weight at 24 weeks. However, post-hoc analyses revealed that participants whose genetic profile matched them to a balanced diet (BDG) lost more weight compared to all others at 8 weeks (5.0% vs. 2.9%, respectively, p < 0.05), and continued to have significant reduction in BMI (6.4% vs. 3.6%, respectively, p < 0.05) and waist circumference (6.5% vs. 2.6%, respectively, p < 0.05) at 24 weeks. Conclusions and Relevance: Nutrigenetic based individualized diets are unlikely to improve weight loss since patient adherence to any dietary intervention remains poor. However, nutrigenetic testing may identify individuals most likely to benefit from a balanced diet weight loss strategy, and requires further investigation.

Award: $500

Jeremy Karnowski

WACV & Automated Analysis of Video Data for Wildlife Surveillance

Waikoloa Beach, HI

Tuesday, January 6 - Friday, January 9

Abstract: Detecting and tracking social marine mammals, including bottlenose dolphins, can help to explain their social dynamics, predict their behavior, and measure the impact of human interference. Multi-camera setups provide an opportunity to record the behavior of captive dolphins and create a massive dataset from which long term statistics can be extracted, but the use of human experts to track dolphin positions over time demands a high time and financial investment cost. In this paper, we examine automated methods to analyze large video corpora. We use background subtraction to detect dolphins over time in the video data and to visualize the paths by which dolphins regularly traverse their environment. We demonstrate the use of these background subtraction methods as a way to initialize a preexisting real-time compressive tracking algorithm, which previously required human interaction. Detecting when dolphins transfer between pools both supplements 3D tracking efforts, helping identify moments when dolphins move between cameras, and augments human performance, providing a way for researchers to manually annotate dolphin pool positions 14 times as fast.

Award: $500

Justin Huang

iGEM Jamboree

Boston, MA

Saturday, November 1 - Monday, November 3

Abstract: Genetic circuits are often difficult to engineer, requiring months to design, build, and test each individual genetic device involved in the circuit. SBiDer, a web tool developed by the UCSD Software iGEM team, will leverage existing devices to construct a database with consideration for the function of each device interpreted as boolean logic. The data can be queried by the user through SBiDer's visual interface to explore circuit designs. The displayed circuit's literature reference, characterization data, and images of included devices can be viewed through the built-in table. Basic validation of the circuit performance is also provided within in the interface. SBiDer's web of information can be expanded through user-generated additions to the database to improve the efficiency of the application and the accuracy of the models.

Award: $500

Katherine Clark

Hearing Landscape Critically

Harvard University

Wednesday, January 14 - Friday, January 16

Abstract: Parking Lot Park is a performance event that maps the various geographies (geologic, political, social, and sexual) which intersect within the space of San Clemente Canyon, in San Diego, California. Currently known as Marian Bear Memorial Open Space Park, the land has undergone many transformations: a harvesting point for the Kumeyaay Indians and later grazing territory for Mexican cattle ranchers, the presently U.S.-owned canyon was protected from highway expansions in the 1970s by it’s namesake, Marian Bear. Since this period, rampant urban development has hemmed the canyon, creating an island of green in an otherwise suburban landscape. In recent years, the park has become a popular cruising spot for homosexual encounters, sparking a backlash of plainclothes arrests and police surveillance. Part site-specific installation, part aural and visual ethnography, and part ficto- criticism writing, Parking Lot Park unfolds November 2014 as a sound promenade and drive-in theater within the canyon itself. Staged over multiple evenings for audiences of 60, participants will traverse the canyon to discover 6 sound art installations. Each sound promenade station gives voice to an individual layer of the human geography of Marian Bear Park. Projected through a set of custom built speakers, stories are told through recorded vocal narration, interwoven and counterbalanced with processed and manipulated field recorded sounds from the canyon. Cast in concrete, buried under soil, hanging from oak trees, or projected from institutional horns, the sound promenade speakers respond both aurally and visually to the park trails and it’s subject matter. The evening will conclude with a drive-in theater, where participants will return to their cars in the parking lot and watch a 15 minute film about the origin myth erotics of the geologic birth of the canyon, which will include a sound composition designed for the insulated intimacy of a car cab (and broadcast via low-powered FM transmitter). By drawing out individual threads of material and social engagement in San Clemente Canyon, the project proposes that landscape is a constantly shifting expression of emergent, dominant, and residual patterns. Parking Lot Park presents geologic time as both erotic and contingent as the dynamic between lovers, and conversely, that human environmental influence is as much of a layer as sedimentary rock. At the Hearing Landscape Critically conference, we will deliver a hybrid presentation focusing on three of the seven works. We will present the story of Wyatt, a veterinarian who has been using the space for public sex since the late 1980’s; Yoli, an indigenous Kumeyaay captain who used the canyon as a harvesting site in 10,000 BCE; and finally an excerpt from the drive-in theater film dealing with the canyon’s geologic inception 5 and a half million years ago. We will present an excerpt from each piece accompanied by a discussion of the research behind the stories, their accompanying field recordings, and design of their physical installation. Our presentation would ideally be 30 minutes long plus questions. We will transport a set of concrete speakers from San Diego, to give a more vivid image of the physical manifestation of the project. Sound samples: https://soundcloud.com/parkinglotpark Project documentation: http://parkinglotpark.tumblr.com

Award: $500

Meilin Zhan

Annual Meeting of American Name Society 2015

Portland, Oregon

Thursday, January 8 - Saturday, January 10

Abstract: Chinese Students and Their English/Anglicized Names It is common for Chinese students to adopt English/Anglicized personal names when they study in English-speaking countries. Names are elements of language fraught with complicated social implications (Lieberson, 1984). Previous studies (Edwards, 2006; McPherron, 2009) have indicated that these English names have a personal significance for the student. However, it is unclear whether English speakers from other cultural backgrounds understand the social meanings underpinning these names in the same way. This study examines the name-choosing practices of a group of Chinese students in a British University, and the social meanings attributed to those names by their British peers in terms of age, gender, social class and level of education. Data collected from questionnaires and interviews with Chinese students and British students are analyzed. The findings indicate that 1) the majority of Chinese students interviewed have adopted English personal names and these naming choices are motivated by various factors; 2) naming practices can be interpreted as a resource for construction of identities – by adopting English names, Chinese students position local students as ‘others’ who are blocked to use their Chinese names; by adopting unusual English/Anglicized names, Chinese students position themselves as ‘others’ in the host culture; 3) British students share similar interpretations of the names in relation to social meanings; 4) these meanings may be different from the ones intended by the Chinese students who may or may not be aware of this disparity. References: Edwards, R. (2006). What's in a Name? Chinese Learners and the Practice of Adopting"English" Names. Language, Culture and Curriculum, 19(1), 90-103. Lieberson, S. (1984). What’s in a name?... some sociolinguistic possibilities. International journal of the sociology of language, 1984(45), 77-88. McPherron, P. (2009). "My Name Is Money": Name Choices and Global Identifications at a South-Chinese University. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 29(4), 521-536.

Award: $500

Marcela Mendoza

Women in Machine Learning Workshop

Montreal, Canada

Monday, December 8 - Tuesday, December 9

Abstract: Emerging applications such as wearable electronics and the internet of things necessitate wireless transmission of large datasets and generate the need for efficient energy consumption. Exactly digitizing and transmitting this data is energy costly. Most decision-making applications involving this data are statistical. It is well known that for any statistical decision-making problem the posterior distribution is a sufficient statistic. Thus, for the aforementioned applications, it is desirable to locally calculate a posterior distribution and transmit only that information. However, calculating the posterior, especially in large dimensions, is traditionally hard. We here show that for a large class of problems we can exactly compute the posterior distribution using distributed optimization algorithms that are robust to randomness. In these classes of problems, we show that even in very large dimensions, we can perform exact Bayesian inference by simply drawing independent samples and solving distributed convex optimization problems. We accomplish this by formulating Bayesian inference as a problem in finding a nonlinear map that exactly transforms samples from one distribution to samples from the posterior. We show that this problem can be cast as a KL-divergence minimization and moreover that this problem is convex. We also demonstrate that for certain classes of problems this convex framework can be exactly solved with systems of low-energy analog circuits in a parallel, distributed manner. Specifically, we consider applications such as imaging and spectroscopy where the latent signal can be modeled as having a sparse “Laplacian” prior with respect to an appropriate basis, and our measurement model is linear and Gaussian. We show that this distributed algorithm converges in an exponential manner to the true optimization solution. We have implemented this algorithm in the Parallella board, the world’s smallest and most energy efficient supercomputing platform in a proof-of concept to enable emerging applications like wearable electronics. We measure performance of risk minimization within the context of decision-making and show that our algorithm outperforms point estimates methods traditionally used in machine learning applications. To our knowledge, this is the first distributed algorithm that can perform Bayesian Inference in a scalable manner. Our method of calculating the posterior fundamentally differs from methods such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo, and it exhibits better performance-complexity tradeoffs.

Award: $500

Marisa Goo

Society for Neuroscience

Washington D.C.

Saturday, November 15 - Wednesday, November 19

Abstract: Ubiquitination has emerged as a key post-translational modification to regulate trafficking and turnover of synaptic proteins. We have previously determined that the ubiquitination of AMPA receptors (AMPAR) by the HECT E3, ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1 mediates a distinct internalization and endocytic sorting pathway to lysosomes for degradation. Specifically, we found that AMPAR ubiquitination occurs exclusively under AMPAR activation while NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation, which also promotes AMPAR internalization, does not lead to AMPAR ubiquitination. Additionally, in recent studies we show that application of glutamate and glycine does not induce AMPAR ubiquitination. Since glutamate and glycine not only activates AMPAR but also NMDAR, we hypothesized that NMDAR signaling negatively regulates AMPAR ubiquitination by activating a de-ubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) leading to the deubiquitation of AMPARs. To further support this hypothesis, we found that glutamate stimulation with subsequent blockage of NMDAR with APV induced robust AMPAR ubiquitination. We then identified that USP8/UBPY, a DUB which functions in the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway, is specifically activated by NMDAR activation but not AMPAR activation. NMDAR activation leads to a rapid dephosphorylation of USP8, which increases its activity in a calcium dependent manner. Functionally, we found that overexpression of USP8 in hippocampal neurons significantly increases synaptic strength while knockdown of USP8 had significant decrease in synaptic strength. Taken together, we provide the first evidence for diametric and activity-dependent control of not only a ligase but a DUB at synapses in the regulation of surface AMPAR levels and synaptic strength.

Award: $500

Melanie Mccomsey

American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting

Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, December 3 - Sunday, December 7

Abstract: Interaction at velocity: Representing children’s locomotion in the age of mobile video Work on embodied interaction (Streeck, Goodwin and LeBaron 2011) has largely concentrated on social actors who are relatively static in space, investigating phenomena such as gesture, posture, eye gaze, or the manipulation of objects. But not all social actors are so likely to stay in one place; and the availability of increasingly portable video and audio recording equipment means that even the most itinerant bodies might be available for study. This paper explores methodologies for the study of children’s quotidian interaction, which often involves rapid changes of location, and can take place at high speeds and across vaster spaces than is typical for adults. The data come from an extended ethnographic study of bilingual (Zapotec/Spanish) children from Juchitán, Oaxaca, Mexico, which examines the link between spatial practice and spatial cognition. Drawing on extensive video recordings of these children’s interaction with each other and the environment, I discuss the methodological problems posed by this corpus of “interaction at velocity.” I then discuss several techniques for representing both the spatial and temporal elements of these data, including spatialized transcriptions and layered mapping. These techniques help reveal the role of locomotion in structuring children’s interaction, and allow for the visualization of the dynamic coordination of bodies in the material world. Advances in video recording technology allow us to apprehend new embodied phenomena, but also require new techniques for visualization and analysis of these ever more detailed data.

Award: $500

Natasa Garic-humphrey

American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting

Washington, DC

Wednesday, December 3 - Sunday, December 7

Abstract: This paper will explore the complex relationship between protests and plenums in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and the ways they are contributing to the development of an alternative political subjectivity that is slowly breaking away from the pressures of ethno-nationalism. In February 2014, people in more than 30 cities and towns throughout the country protested against social injustice and demanded the end of oligarchy, nepotism, and corruption of the political elite. Soon after the protests in several major cities resulted in violence, a new space was opened for Bosnian people to publicly voice their indignation and formulate alternative practices of direct democracy in a more peaceful way. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Bosnia-Herzegovina during these uprisings, I am tracing the processes of people’s transition from protests to plenum – from participating in the protests filled with emotion such as anger, outrage, frustration, worry, and fear, to participating in the plenum, a space that is supposed to be safe, transparent, open to everybody, and where collective anger is expected to be channeled into productive results that will bring about change. I trace the struggles and motivations of activists who are in the very epicenter of an extremely emotional, draining, and difficult process that is subject to constant sabotage and manipulation, coming from inside and outside of the group. I ask a question in what ways do emotions change in the process of transition from protests to plenum, if they do at all, and in what ways do emotions shape the goals of people’s actions.

Award: $500

Priscilla Garcia

113th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association

Washington, DC

Wednesday, December 3 - Tuesday, October 7

Abstract: Title of paper: “When the Just Govern, the People rejoice”: Pentecostal Politics and Transformation in Brazil This paper explores the involvement of Pentecostal believers with politics in recent years in Brazil and investigates the role of the core Pentecostal category of transformation embedded in this political enterprise. I argue that the idea of transformation – conceived in Brazilian Pentecostalism as a transformation of the self and of society – is constitutive of a political theology triggered by a Pentecostal model of politics. In this model, religion and politics are no longer conceived in the traditional liberal Western dichotomies in which a hiatus exists between religion and politics, civil law and religious law, the church and the state, and so forth. Politics, for these Brazilian Pentecostal believers, is conceived as a landscape that these believers are called upon to act on and transform, as part of their life as (good) Christians. After a period of pre-dissertation fieldwork, I note that these Brazilian Pentecostals work to transform themselves and the religious movement they integrate politically – through a process I denominate Political Evangelization – which entails the transformation of Pentecostal citizenship into a genuinely accepted Christian practice in the church/private settings. In the same fashion, these believers also work to transform society and its moral demises brought about mainly by addiction, corruption, and homosexuality through political participation and involvement in the Brazilian National Congress.

Award: $500

Quentin Gautier

International Conference on Field-Programmable Technology (ICFPT)

Shanghai, China

Wednesday, December 10 - Friday, December 12

Abstract: Embedding real-time 3D reconstruction of a scene from a low-cost depth sensor can improve the development of technologies in the domains of augmented reality, mobile robotics, and more. However, current implementations require a computer with a powerful GPU, which limits its prospective applications with low-power requirements. To implement low-power 3D reconstruction we embedded two prominent algorithms of 3D reconstruction (Iterative Closest Point and Volumetric Integration) on an Altera Stratix V FPGA by using the OpenCL language and the Altera OpenCL SDK. In this paper, we present our application and evaluation of the Altera tool in terms of performance, area, and programmability trade-offs. We have verified that OpenCL can be a viable method for developing FPGA applications by modifying an open-source version of the Microsoft KinectFusion project to run partially on a FPGA.

Award: $500

Rauno Cavallaro

SCITECH2015

Kissimmee, FL

Monday, January 5 - Friday, January 9

Abstract: Conference accepts Extended Abstracts. In the following, part of the introduction of one of the paper I'll present is reported: " It is a recurring circumstance, in aircraft design, to re-size layout after a preliminary assessment of a solution outcome of a conceptual design stage. For cantilevered classical configurations, after years of practice and experience this problem has been mitigated and does not represent an insurmountable issue. For Joined Wings there is no similar industrial experience. Thus, attempts to conceptually design such a configuration using handbook or very low fidelity tools have always resulted in non-competitive layouts. However, the situation is actually even more challenging. Due to the geometrical layout of a typical Joined Wing, there is an unavoidable coupling of the different disciplines. This paper presents the study of the aeroelastic phenomena when (structural) nonlinearities are taken into consideration. In detail, it focuses on the impact of control surface freeplay on futter which has never been studied before for Joined Wings. Differently than traditional configurations, for the PrandtlPlane Joined Wings there are multiple mobile surfaces located on two wings. Thus, the response of the system will be the result of a complicated interaction of each control surface freeplay. A physical understanding of the dynamic aeroelastic response due to these effects on a realistic configuration is then crucial for an effective design.

Award: $500

Rachel Ostrand

Psychonomic Society Annual Meeting

Long Beach, CA

Thursday, November 20 - Sunday, November 23

Abstract: What You See Isn't Always What You Get: Auditory Word Signals Trump Consciously-Perceived Words in Early Lexical Access Speech perception involves the integration of audio and visual components. A mismatch between these causes the McGurk illusion, in which listeners perceive a fusion of the two streams, implying each contributes to speech perception. Two semantic priming experiments assessed whether the auditory signal alone versus the fused percept is lexically accessed. Participants performed a lexical decision task on target words related (or unrelated) to either the audio signal or the fused percept of McGurk stimuli (Bait[audio]-->Date[percept]). When primes and targets were separated by 50ms, McGurk stimuli primed targets related to the auditory signal ("worm") but not the percept ("time"). With a 300ms ISI, this pattern flipped – priming was observed for the percept but not the auditory word (priming “time” but not “worm”). Thus, early lexical access is based on the auditory word, whereas later lexical access is based on the additional, updated information from the integrated audio-visual percept.

Award: $300

Rachel Schwartz

AGU Fall Meeting

San Francisco, CA

Monday, December 15 - Friday, December 19

Abstract: North American west coast summer low cloudiness: Broadscale variability associated with sea surface temperature Rachel E. Schwartz, Alexander Gershunov, Sam F. Iacobellis, and Daniel R. Cayan Six decades of observations at 20 coastal airports, from Alaska to southern California, reveal coherent interannual to interdecadal variation of coastal low cloudiness (CLC) from summer to summer over this broad region. The leading mode of CLC variability represents coherent variation, accounting for nearly 40% of the total CLC variance spanning 1950–2012. This leading mode and the majority of individual airports exhibit decreased low cloudiness from the earlier to the later part of the record. Exploring climatic controls on CLC, we identify North Pacific Sea Surface Temperature anomalies, largely in the form of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) as well correlated with, and evidently helping to organize, the coherent patterns of summer coastal cloud variability. Links from the PDO to summer CLC appear a few months in advance of the summer. These associations hold up consistently in interannual and interdecadal frequencies.

Award: $300

Samuel Dunscombe

Hearing Landscapes Critically Conference

Harvard University

Wednesday, January 14 - Friday, January 16

Abstract: Parking Lot Park is a performance event that maps the various geographies (geologic, political, social, and sexual) which intersect within the space of San Clemente Canyon, in San Diego, California. Currently known as Marian Bear Memorial Open Space Park, the land has undergone many transformations: a harvesting point for the Kumeyaay Indians and later grazing territory for Mexican cattle ranchers, the presently U.S.-owned canyon was protected from highway expansions in the 1970s by it’s namesake, Marian Bear. Since this period, rampant urban development has hemmed the canyon, creating an island of green in an otherwise suburban landscape. In recent years, the park has become a popular cruising spot for homosexual encounters, sparking a backlash of plainclothes arrests and police surveillance. Part site-specific installation, part aural and visual ethnography, and part ficto-criticism writing, Parking Lot Park unfolds November 2014 as a sound promenade and drive-in theater within the canyon itself. Staged over multiple evenings for audiences of 60, participants will traverse the canyon to discover 6 sound art installations. Each sound promenade station gives voice to an individual layer of the human geography of Marian Bear Park. Projected through a set of custom built speakers, stories are told through recorded vocal narration, interwoven and counterbalanced with processed and manipulated field recorded sounds from the canyon. Cast in concrete, buried under soil, hanging from oak trees, or projected from institutional horns, the sound promenade speakers respond both aurally and visually to the park trails and it’s subject matter. The evening will conclude with a drive-in theater, where participants will return to their cars in the parking lot and watch a 15 minute film about the origin myth erotics of the geologic birth of the canyon, which will include a sound composition designed for the insulated intimacy of a car cab (and broadcast via low-powered FM transmitter). By drawing out individual threads of material and social engagement in San Clemente Canyon, the project proposes that landscape is a constantly shifting expression of emergent, dominant, and residual patterns. Parking Lot Park presents geologic time as both erotic and contingent as the dynamic between lovers, and conversely, that human environmental influence is as much of a layer as sedimentary rock. At the Hearing Landscape Critically conference, we will deliver a hybrid presentation focusing on three of the seven works. We will present the story of Wyatt, a veterinarian who has been using the space for public sex since the late 1980’s; Yoli, an indigenous Kumeyaay captain who used the canyon as a harvesting site in 10,000 BCE; and finally an excerpt from the drive-in theater film dealing with the canyon’s geologic inception 5 and a half million years ago. We will present an excerpt from each piece accompanied by a discussion of the research behind the stories, their accompanying field recordings, and design of their physical installation. Our presentation would ideally be 30 minutes long plus questions. We will transport a set of concrete speakers from San Diego, to give a more vivid image of the physical manifestation of the project.

Award: $500

Savithry Namboodiripad

The Annual Meeting of the Linguistics Society of America

Portland, Oregon

Thursday, January 8 - Sunday, January 11

Abstract: Moraic geminates in Malayalam: evidence from minimal word e ects and loanword adaptation We present new evidence to show that, contrary to previous stress-based analyses (e.g. Mohanan (1989)), Malay- alam geminates must be moraic in at least some contexts. We present and discuss evidence for the moraicity of geminates in both native words and in loanword adaptations, and we provide criteria for determining which of two strategies are used in the adaptation of CVC loanwords from English. The minimal word in Malayalam is bimoraic (Mohanan (1989)). Vowel and consonant length is phonemic, and long vowels are bimoraic, though CVC syllables are monomoraic (Broselow et al. (1997)). Both schwas and geminates have been claimed to be nonmoraic (Cyran (2001); Mohanan (1989)). However, evidence from native Malayalam words shows that geminates must be moraic; CVC:@ structures are licit (1), while *CVC@ structures are not (2): (1) pal:@ CVC:@ `tooth' (2) * pal@ CVC@ The contrast between (1) and (2) can only be explained if we assume that the geminate in (1) is moraic, satisfying the minimal word requirement. Further evidence that geminates are moraic comes from loanword adaptation. Malayalam speakers adapt CVC words from English using two di erent strategies: in (3), the vowel is lengthened, while in (4), the vowel stays short and the coda consonant is geminated, which results in a word with the structure CVC:@. In both cases, a schwa is epenthesized in order to resolve an illicit coda, but crucially, in order to account for examples like (4), geminates must be moraic, as /@/ does not contribute a mora and the minimal word must be bimoraic. (3) a. /phA:s/ (English input) b. pa:s@ (vowel-lengthened loanword) `pass' (4) a. /b2s/ (English input) b. bas:@ (geminated loanword) `bus' Choice of strategy depends on perceived vowel length. English tense vowels are adapted as long Malayalam vowels, as in (5), while lax vowels are borrowed as short vowels with geminate coda consonants, as in (6). The one exception is lax /æ/ (7), which we assume is due to its greater phonetic length (van Santen (1992)). (5) a. /seIl/ (input) b. * sel:@ (geminate) c. se:l@ (long vowel) `sale' (6) a. /k2p/ (input) b. kap:@ (geminate) c. * ka:p@ (long vowel) `cup' (7) a. /mæp/ (input) b. * map:@ (geminate) c. ma:p@ (long vowel) `map' English CVC loanwords can undergo gemination in order to satisfy minimal word constraints in Malayalam, and this process is sensitive to both phonemic length (= tense vowels) and phonetic length (= //) in English. The gemination strategy is unexpected given previous analyses claiming that Malayalam geminates are nonmoraic. Our analysis, which treats Malayalam geminates as moraic, correctly accounts for the gemination strategy for loanword adaptation, explains the presence of native words with the structure CVC:@, and preserves the inherent moraicity of geminates, as posited in Moraic Theory (Hayes (1989)). In the talk, we will also discuss the implications of this analysis for longer loanwords and the moraic status of geminates in other positions.

Award: $500

Sean Crosby

American Geophysical Union 2014

San Francisco, CA

Monday, December 15 - Friday, December 19

Abstract: AGU 2014 Abstract Session 1743, Nearshore Processes Poster Requested S.C.H Crosby, W.C. O’Reilly, and R.T. Guza Title: Improving coastal wave hindcasts by combining offshore buoy observations with global wave models. Waves conditions in southern California are sensitive to offshore wave directions. Due to blocking by coastal islands and refraction across complex bathymetry, a <10o difference in incident wave direction can dramatically change coastal wave energy. Directional wave buoys are fundamentally low-resolution instruments, while the directional bin widths of operational wind-wave models are coarse (e.g. 10o). Operational wind-wave models have useful prediction skill in the nearshore, however, wave buoy measurements, when combined with standard directional estimation techniques, are shown to provide significantly better hindcasts. Techniques to combine offshore global wave model predictions (NOAA’s Wave Watch 3 hindcasts) and offshore buoy measurements are being developed. The skill of different combination methodologies as an offshore boundary condition is assessed using spectral ray-tracing methods to transform incident, offshore swell spectra to shallow water buoy locations. A nearly continuous 10 yr data set of approximately 14 buoys is used. Comparisons include standard bulk parameters (e.g. significant wave height, peak period), the frequency-dependent energy spectrum (needed for run-up estimation) and radiation stress component Sxy (needed for alongshore current and sediment transport estimation). Global wave model uncertainties are unknown, complicating the formulation of optimum assimilation constraints. Several plausible models for estimating offshore waves are tested. Future work includes assimilating nearshore buoy observations, with the long-term objective of accurate regional wave hindcasts using an efficient mix of global wave models and buoys. This work is supported by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Division of Boating and Waterways Oceanography Program.

Award: $300

Silvia Saccardo

Society for Judgment and Decision Making Annual conference

Long Beach, CA

Friday, November 21 - Monday, November 24

Abstract: Bribing the Self (by Uri Gneezy, Silvia Saccardo, Marta Serra-Garcia, Roel van Veldhuizen). Abstract: We examine whether individuals are more likely to behave unethically when they can engage in self-deception, convincing themselves that their behavior is ethical. In two experiments, decision-makers evaluate two options and are asked to recommend one based on quality. In both cases they are provided with a monetary incentive to recommend one of the options. When informed about the incentive before learning about the options, individuals' choices are systematically biased in the direction of the incentive. However, when this information comes after they learn about the quality of the options, this bias is reduced and choices are more honest.

Award: $300

Sowparnika Balaswaminathan

ANCER's New Voices, Current Perspectives: Arts Management, Policy and Development in Asia

Singapore

Thursday, November 13 - Saturday, November 15

Abstract: Gods, Government, & Men: Demonstrating Agency as Craftpersons Negotiating Tradition and Commerce The craft industry in India is the fastest growing export sector, employing millions of people. Thus, the Government of India promotes craft through developmental projects implemented at the Centre and State. My research concerns a community of sculptors who produce such an export-oriented craft-object, the Swamimalai bronzes. The State government has been fostering the traditional ethos of bronzecasting while also re-creating it as a secular, export-oriented industry through Poompuhar Art and Metal Institute, a training institute (and distribution centre) at Swamimalai, Tamilnadu. This creates a duality of purposes requiring a negotiation between the concepts of "tradition" and "modernity". In my paper I investigate the impact of governmental policy through pedagogical instruction, and marketing on individual bronzecasters in Swamimalai. I contend that there has been a separation of the craft into theory and practice where the former is considered as valuable but unnecessary. However, instead of avoiding theory, bronzecasters commingle it with practice by performing the theoretical aspects at their workshop as "demonstrations", making them an integral part of the labour of the traditional craft. Finally, I argue that this labour of "demonstration" is an agentive act by bronzecasters to negotiate the artificial categories of tradition and modernity created by governmental institutions through handicraft policies.

Award: $500

Stacy Williams

Social Science History Association Annual Conference

Toronto, Ontario

Thursday, November 6 - Sunday, November 9

Abstract: Many women belonged to both the suffrage and temperance movements. Given the similar constituencies, did suffrage and temperance produce similar discourses about cooking, a supposedly personal task? Previous studies cannot explain why suffragists would politicize cooking, since cooking could not achieve the movement’s goal of enfranchising women. Thus, we might expect suffrage and temperance discourses about cooking to be similar, if the same women were writing about personal issues unaffected by movement activity. To test this, I analyze over 800 articles about cooking in the national suffrage and temperance newspapers. Contrary to expectations, these movements produced markedly different discourses about cooking. Suffrage discourse about cooking proposed new ways to feed the family while lightening women’s work in the home. Alternatively, temperance discourse about cooking argued that women needed to continue cooking, for their role as family cook was crucial for preserving the health, morality, and sobriety of the nation. I argue that activists write about cooking differently for each movement because when they step into the role of suffragist or temperance activist, they will use cultural schemas about gender that are conventional within that particular movement context. Thus, when writing about cooking for a suffrage newspaper, activists employ schemas of gender equality; when writing about cooking for a temperance newspaper, activists employ schemas of traditional femininity. This paper proposes a new understanding of how social movements politicize personal, daily actions, which extends to more types of movements than accounted for under previous explanations of personal politics.

Award: $500

Stephanie Sherman

Housing Merz in the 21st C + Redial

London, UK

Thursday, November 27 - Friday, November 28

Abstract: In 2003, a group of college graduates moved into the center of an abandoned thrift store in Greensboro NC. Today, 11 years later, their living museum and artist residency called Elsewhere is known internationally, and is a leader in pioneering global interactions and local practice. A store where nothing for sale has been converted into a medium for communication and collaboration. In the process, the once sleepy town of Greensboro has become a vibrant art district, involving Elsewhere as a major player in redeveloping the landscape of the city. I will discuss Elsewhere’s history and present reflections and observations as co-founder and director of the site from 2003-2013, and at present board member and curator of special projects. Elsewhere’s role in cultivating a wild thrift store and a veritably abandoned downtown provides points for reflection on evolutionary, organic processes that rely on crossed jurisdictions and civic knowledge, collaborative approaches to project development and shared building operations. Considering methods of knowing offered by George Perec, Michel de Certeau, and Foucualt, we will reflect on the ways that encountering the wild is a site-sensitive episteme, considering traps to look out for and openings for the development of systems that get beyond subject/artist, artist/world dichotomies. The artist escapes into the wild to replay a primitive fantasy of production, wherein the projection of tools, spaces, and buildings meets the post-modern landscapes of tourism, rhetorics of economy, These lessons can be crucial for helping to assess resources, tensions, desires, and productive elements in the development of Merz Barn and its perimeters and peripheries.

Award: $500

Steven Pan

Psychonomic Society 55th Annual Meeting

Long Beach

Thursday, November 20 - Sunday, November 23

Abstract: Does Test-Enhanced Learning Transfer for Triple Associates? Steven C. Pan and Timothy C. Rickard, University of California, San Diego Transfer of test-enhanced learning in the case of tripled associate word stimuli was assessed in four experiments. In contrast with the robust transfer that has been demonstrated for paired associates, we observed minimal transfer from trained to untrained items for tripled associates. That result held when one or two items from each triplet was tested on during training, as well as when one item from each triplet was repeatedly tested on during training. However, testing on all possible items for each triplet resulted in an amplification of test-enhanced learning. Thus, although test-enhanced learning appears to transfer minimally for triplets, and likely other multielement stimuli, where feasible, testing on many or all possible stimulus-response combinations can be highly productive for learning.

Award: $300

Tyler Marghetis

Conceptual Structure, Discourse, and Language

Santa Barbara, CA

Tuesday, November 4 - Thursday, November 6

Abstract: Gesture shapes the conceptualization of abstract mathematical concepts Gesture can influence speakers’ thoughts, prompting them to encode concrete details of activity [1] or use novel reasoning strategies [2, 5]. But gestures can represent more than actions, objects, or algorithms. Metaphorical gestures use space to represent otherwise abstract domains [3]. For instance, a variety of conceptual metaphors can be used to understand arithmetic [6], and these metaphors are reflected in co-speech gesture: “Path” gestures represent arithmetic as motion along a path; “Collection” gestures represent addition as combining collections [7]. Can metaphorical gestures shape people’s metaphorical understanding? One implicit measure of the mental representation of number is the SNARC (Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes) [4]. Among literate Western adults, smaller numbers prompt faster responses in left space, while larger numbers prompt faster responses in right space, suggesting that numbers are conceptualized as a left-to-right “mental number-line.” Here, we ask whether this mental number-line is shaped by seeing and producing metaphorical gestures. Methods: Participants (n = 60) began with a Gesture Training task. Randomly placed in one of two conditions, they were taught to gesture about numbers and arithmetic as either Locations Along a Path or as Collections. We created videos—eight in each condition—in which a man expressed an arithmetical fact (e.g. “four plus five is nine”) in speech and gesture. Videos in each condition used the same eight audio files, paired with either Path or Collection gestures (Fig. 1). Participants had to reproduce each video’s speech and gesture (four times per video). They then completed a Number Comparison task. Participants responded with their left or right hand to indicate whether numbers (1 to 9) were greater or less than 5. The mapping between magnitude and response (e.g., > 5 → respond on right) was manipulated between blocks; block order was counterbalanced. Results: The Number Comparison task was investigated with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) of reaction times, with Gesture Condition (Path, Collection) as a between-subjects factor, and Magnitude (<5, >5) and Response (left, right) as within-subjects factors. There was a highly significant interaction between Number and Response, F(1,141) = 20.7, p < 0.0001, with responses faster on the left for smaller numbers, and faster on the right for larger numbers—the SNARC effect. Critically, this was modulated by an interaction with Gesture Condition, F(1,141) = 8.5, p = 0.004 (Fig. 2, left panels). The SNARC effect was significant for participants in the Path condition (p < 0.001) but only marginal for those in the Collection condition (p = 0.08). Regression analyses confirmed that, regardless of Gesture Condition, most participants showed a canonical SNARC effect (Path: 18/24, p = .02; Collection: 18/25, p = 0.04), but the SNARC effect was more pronounced in the Path condition, t(47) = -1.9, p = 0.03 (one-tailed; Fig. 2, right panel). Conclusion: Speakers’ gestures about arithmetic shaped their “mental number-line.” Gesturing about numbers as locations along a path led speakers to conceptualize numbers as locations arranged from left to right. This is, to our knowledge, the first evidence of a causal influence of metaphorical co-speech gestures on metaphorical thought, adding to the evidence that gestures not only reflect but also influence cognitive processing [e.g. 1, 2, 5]. The hands spatialize the abstract, and this, in turn, spatializes thought.   References [1] Beilock, S. L. & Goldin-Meadow, S. (2010). Gesture changes thought by grounding it in action. Psychological Science, 21, 1605-1610. [2] Chu, M., & Kita, S. (2008). Spontaneous gestures during mental rotation tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 137, 706-723. [3] Cienki, A., & Muller, C. (2008). Metaphor, gesture, and thought. In R.W. Gibbs (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Metaphor and Thought. Cambridge: CUP. [4] Dehaene, S., Bossini, S., Giraux, P. (1993). The mental representation of parity and number magnitude. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 122, 371-396. [5] Goldin-Meadow, S., Cook, S. W., & Mitchell, Z. A. (2009). Gesturing gives children new ideas about math. Psychological Science, 20, 267-272 [6] Lakoff, G. & Núñez, R. (2000). Where Mathematics Comes From: How the embodied mind brings mathematics into being. New York: Basic Books. [7] Núñez, R., & Author1 (in press). Cognitive Linguistics and Concept(s) of Number. R. Cohen-Kadosh & K. Dowker (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Numerical Cognition. OUP.

Award: $300

Wangzhong Sheng

Falling Walls Venture Conference

Berlin, Germany

Saturday, November 8 - Sunday, November 9

Abstract: eLux Medical will speak about their innovation, NanoLipo, a gold nanorod-assisted photothermal technique as a means of improving liposuction, and its potential for commercial translation.

Award: $500